Thursday, July 26, 2012

A Bibliography - made with Zotero

Below is a bibliography made by pasting one of my “collections” into a word document from Zotero stand alone on a Mac.

Having done this I now realise how quickly we could do them and annotate them.

/dlh.

Industrial Objects Bibliography (ruff)

1.

ADAMS, Chris and HALLAM, David. Finishes on aluminium: a conservation perspective. In: Saving the twentieth century: the conservation of modern materials: proceedings of a conference Symposium 91: Saving the Twentieth Century, Ottawa, Canada, 15 to 20 September, 1991 = Sauvegarder le XXe siècle: la dégradation et conservation des matériaux modernes: les actes de la conférence Symposium 91: Sauvegarde le XXe siècle, Ottawa, Canada, du 15 au 20 septembre 1991. Canada: Canadian Conservation Institute, 1993. pp. 273–286. ISBN 0660578549.

In terms of volume of production, aluminium is the world’s leading nonferrous metal. Because of its lightness and unique physical and chemical properties, its suitability for the construction of aircraft was recognised early this century. With the development of aluminium and its alloys as a construction material, the need arose for stable and resistant surface finishes. Surface finishing techniques developed rapidly in both Europe and the US. Today, several important classes of finishes are used. The Australian War Memorial (AWM) has an extensive collection of aluminium aircraft, which illustrate the development of aluminium alloys as structural materials and the associated coating technologies, especially oxide conversion coatings. In museums, it has been observed that these finishes have, to a large extent, been ignored, to the detriment of objects, their history, and conservation in general. These coatings can offer important historical and technical information. As intrinsic parts of the object, every effort should be made to devise conservation strategies to retain them. Further, it is only through an understanding of the construction of an object and its deterioration that appropriate treatments can be developed. Methods of categorisation and analysis developed and used at the AWM are discussed, along with the reproduction of various coatings from the original formulations, conservation strategies, and a discussion of the relevance of surface coatings studies to the museum. Author Abstract

2.

AERO-BLAST PRODUCTS, Inc. Aero-Blast Products. S.l. [no date].

0000

Advises on facility and aircraft preparation for dry blast paint removal on aircraft, also lists examples of paint and coating removal, and estimation of compressed air needs.

(02) Non-Chemical Depainting Compounds, Equipment Technology (42) Have photocopy

3.

AGARWALA, V.S., REED, P.L. and AHMAD, S.S. Corrosion Detection and Monitoring-A Review. In: CORROSION 2000. 2000,

0027

4.

AGARWALA, V.S. and RIVER, P. Sensors in Corrosion. In: Houston, TX: NACE. 2005,

5.

ANON. Cocoon Packaging. In: The Engineer. 1947, Vol. 184, no. 4775, pp. pp.102–103.

0000

Describes the “Coccon” method of packaging in which plastic webbings and coatings are applied to the metal surface.

(42) Have photocopy

6.

ANON. The Proceedings of the International Seminar Entitled Aircraft to Artifact: Exploring the principles of Historic Preservation. Wilmington De 19808 USA: TIGHAR, 1991.

0000

undefined (13)  Royal Airforce Museum (26)  48pp (27)  ring bound

1.

ASHTON, John and HALLAM, David. The conservation of functional objects--an ethical dilemma. In: AICCM bulletin. 1990, Vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 19–26.

The ethics and practice of conservation of nonworking objects, including ethnographic and paper artefacts, are as well defined as we can expect. The application of standard conservation thinking to objects that work or have the potential to work is fraught with problems. Most working objects have their own tradition of maintenance and repair; however, if these are applied to objects in museums, problems can occur. This article examines some of the problems in conserving working objects and promotes debate in this growing area of conservation. Author Abstract Therese Mulford

2.

B.R.W, Hinton, N.E, Ryan and P.N, Trathen. The Inhibition of Corrosion and Stress-Corrosion in High Strength Aluminium Alloys By Surface-Active Agents. In: S.l.: s.n., pp. pp.1–7.

0000

The corrosion inhibiting properties of several alkyl aromatic sulphates have been evaluated in laboratory tests, with a view to having them incorporated in aircraft wash solutions.

F: PBS Record: 190; O: (03) Aeronautical Research Laboratories, Victoria, Australia (13) Toronto, Canada (42) Have photocopy

3.

BAGLIONI, Michele, GIORGI, Rodorico, BERTI, Debora and BAGLIONI, Piero. Smart cleaning of cultural heritage: a new challenge for soft nano science. In: Nanoscale [online]. 2012, Vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 42–53. DOI 10.1039/C1NR10911A. Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/C1NR10911A.

0000

The search for innovative, smart and performing cleaning agents is one of the main issues of modern conservation science. Nanosciences do not only provide solutions to this scientific field in terms of new materials but also change radically the approach to problems and challenges. In this feature article we review the most innovative nano structured systems developed in the last decade for the cleaning of artworks together with some noteworthy case studies. Micelles, micro emulsions, thickened complex fluids, and responsive gels that constitute the new “cleaning palette” for modern conservators are here presented and critically analysed. The development of these smart nano structured systems requires the comprehension of their behaviour and interactions with other materials down to the nanoscale. In the last section of this manuscript we report on the most recent results from a study about the mechanism of polymer removal from porous artefacts using nano fluids, such as micelles or micro emulsions. The rules of classical detergency do not fully address the polymer removal mechanism and a schematic model of the process is proposed.

4.

BAILEY, D. E. World War II Wrecks of the Truk Lagoon. In: World War II Wrecks of the Truk Lagoon. 2000,

1065

Cited By (since 1996): 1

5.

BAILEY, G.T. Stabilization of a wrecked and corroded aluminium aircraft. In: Metal 04: proceedings of the International Conference on Metals Conservation = actes de la conférence internationale sur la conservation des métaux, Canberra, Australia, 4-8 October 2004. Australia: National Museum of Australia, 2004. pp. 453–464. ISBN 1-876944-33-1.

In 1984 the Australian War Memorial, Royal Australian Air Force, and Royal Australian Navy recovered a Japanese Army Air Force Nakajima Ki-43 II “Oscar” fighter aircraft from Papua New Guinea. The aircraft had crashed at the end of an airfield and had been sitting in swampy ground since 1944, and it had subsequently corroded and suffered extensive deterioration. In 1996 electrolytic treatment for corroded composite metal artifacts had developed to the stage where it was feasible to electrochemically treat “Oscar” without needing to break down the aircraft into small separate components. An aboveground swimming pool was erected and filled with a solution of citric acid, sodium hydroxide, and water. An electrolytic cell was formed by using expanded stainless steel mesh as anodes and making the aircraft the cathode. An applied potential of approximately 1.15 volts, (with respect to a mercury sulfate electrode) was administered for one month. Electrolysis was followed by a further polarization in fresh water for one week to remove the chemicals. Upon removal from the pool, the aircraft was cosmetically treated to remove flash rust and finally coated with wax. During the treatment, samples were taken from the pool to monitor pH and concentrations of dissolved chloride, iron, copper, and aluminum. Author Abstract ICCROM Maria Corsino

6.

BARCLAY, R. L. The preservation and use of historic musical instruments: display case and concert hall. London Sterling: Earthscan, 2005.

7.

BEARDMORE, Janine. Corosion Inhibitors for Aluminium. In: AICCM National Newsletter No. 38. March 1991,

0000

Protective coating

(42) Experimenting on protective coating on Aluminium

8.

BERG, S. A study of sample withdrawal for lubricated systems. Part 1: influence of flow characteristics, sampling techniques and locations. In: Industrial Lubrication and Tribology. 2001, Vol. 53, no. 1, pp. 22–32.

9.

BERGSTRÖM, Lars. How do we preserve knowledge and skills when their practitioners no longer exist? In: Industrial patrimony: resources, practices, cultures. 2003, Vol. 5, no. 9, pp. 23–27.

Examines the ongoing debate in Sweden on how to preserve material industrial heritage. He mentions an experiment, carried out by the Forsvik Museum, on the conservation of the heritage of metal industries. He takes the view that if human labor and human know-how is not conserved or reenacted, buildings and machinery cannot teach us anything beyond their material appearance and size. Research and pedagogy are needed in order to ensure the dissemination of this know-how. It constitutes an intangible heritage of gestures and practices that were passed on from one worker to another and from one generation to the next. The author shows how workshops on mechanics are being used for this purpose. ICCROM Letícia Leitão

10.

BHUSHAN, B. Tribology: Friction, wear, and lubrication. S.l.: CRC Press, Boca Raton, 2000.

0009

11.

BICHLMEIER, S., JANSSENS, K., HECKEL, J., HOFFMANN, P. and ORTNER, H. M. Comparative material characterization of historical and industrial samples by using a compact micro-XRF spectrometer. In: X-Ray Spectrometry [online]. January 2002, Vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 87–91. [Accessed 31 May 2012]. DOI 10.1002/xrs.563. Available from: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/xrs.563.

12.

BITCON, J. C. and RUSSO, S. G. Modification of the Geographic Corrosivity Index and its Application to Overseas Bases. S.l. DTIC Document, 2008.

0000

13.

BOWDITCH, John. Motion: The Soul of the Machine. In: MAPES, Mark G (ed.), Risks and Rewards: Perspectives on operating Mechanical Artifacts. Hagley Museum and Library: Hagley Museum and Library, 1991. pp. pp3–13.

0000

undefined (02)  Curator of Industry (03)  Henry Ford Museum (08)  Hagley Fellow and Conference coordinator (13)  Hagley Museum and Library

14.

BRUEGGERHOFF, Stefan, KOENIG, Lars, OCHWAT, Christian and SEIDEL, Steffen. Preservation of industrial heritage objects presented in a critical climate environment: the demonstration mine of the German Mining Museum. In: Sborník z konference konzervátoru a restaurátoru. 2008, pp. 28–32.

0000

Building of the demonstration mine at the German Mining Museum was begun in the 1930s. It has an overall circular track length of about 2.5 km and is located about 20 m below the museum. With its special ambiance, the mine is one of the greatest attractions of the museum. Many objects assembled there during a continual expansion process are rare museum objects now. Thus they lost their demonstration status and changed to become parts of the museum collection. Unfortunately, environmental conditions in the mine are quite corrosive, with a high degree of humidity and water condensation on object surfaces for considerable times. Up to now the metal equipment was treated in a conventional way: paint stripping and new coating. Currently there is an attempt to change to techniques that are more oriented to a conservation philosophy. Research has been done within the EC Project CONSIST (Comparison of conservation materials and strategies for sustainable exploitation of immovable industrial cultural heritage made of iron and steel). Different transparent coatings (new ORMOCER materials and promising commercial products) have been tested in the lab but also in the mine. Additionally, a study was initiated to look for a dehumidification air-conditioning system for the mine. First results demonstrate that a certain dehumidification is necessary to enable application of transparent coatings. [Editor’s note: A Czech language version of this article precedes the English version; see AATA 2011-121077.] Author Abstract

15.

BRUNOTT, Michael, GREINER, Ainslie, HALLAM, David and THURROWGOOD, David. Conservation maintenance programs for functional objects. In: Metal 2010: proceedings of the interim meeting of the ICOM-CC Metal Working Group, October 11-15, 2010, Charleston, South Carolina, USA. United States: Clemson University, 2011. pp. 421–429. ISBN 978-0-9830399-2-1 (color); 978-0-9830399-1-4 (b&w).

0000

Multiple and often mutually exclusive points of view develop around collections and their uses as social resources. In this context, conservators require a decision-making framework for care and maintenance of functional objects. In this article, the authors explain some of the ethical and practical considerations that have led the National Museum of Australia (NMA) to adopt maintenance programs as the best strategy for the conservation of technological heritage collections. The deterioration caused by passive storage is outlined, and the lack of deterioration caused by systematic maintenance programs is enunciated. The idea of imbedding a constant monitoring, improvement, and feedback plan into the program is explained. An object in the collection of the NMA is examined after a decade on display under this regime. The authors conclude that the ability to function is one of the significant attributes of an object that should be conserved wherever practically possible. Author Abstract

16.

BUCKLEY, D.H., JONES JR, W.R., SLINEY, H.E., ZARETSKY, E.V., TOWNSEND, D.P. and LOEWENTHAL, S.H. Tribology: The Story of Lubrication and Wear. S.l. National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (USA). Lewis Research Center, 1985.

0001

17.

CAMPBELL, S.A., GILLARD, S.P., BEECH, I.B., DAVIES, W., MONGER, G. and LAWTON, P. The s.v. Cutty Sark: electrochemistry in conservation. In: Transactions of the Institute of Metal Finishing. 2005, Vol. 83, no. 1, pp. 19–26.

0008

The s.v. Cutty Sark is the last surviving example of an extreme clipper built for the profitable China tea trade. Although expected to be in service for 30 years, the ship has survived to the present day with approximately 80% of the original structure remaining. However, the ship is now showing signs of deterioration, particularly chloride-sponsored corrosion of the bolts used to secure the iron frame. As the s.v. Cutty Sark is one of three remaining vessels of composite construction, its preservation is essential for UK and world maritime heritage. This study describes an evaluation of the possibility of using an electrochemical method to remove the aggressive chloride ions from the wood/metal matrix structures on the ship. The presence of these species is a major problem associated with the conservation of maritime artifacts, and although studies have proven the usefulness of this technique for the conservation of large metal structures, e.g., the World War I gunboat M33, its effects on chloride ion-contaminated wood/metal composites had not been evaluated. The results from this work showed that by careful selection of the electrochemical and microbiological control parameters, it is possible to successfully electrolyze wood and iron assemblies without degradation of either the wood or the iron. A subsequent pilot study in the aft peak area of the ship further confirmed the feasibility of using electrolysis to remove chloride ions from the wood/iron matrix. Author Abstract Thomas Shreves

18.

CARL SCHLICHTING. The Consuming pasion of Operating Machines. In: MARK G MAPES (ed.), Risks and Rewards: Perspectives on operating Mechanical Artifacts. Hagley Museum and Library: Hagley Museum and Library, 1991. pp. pp 20–27.

0000

undefined (02)  Industrial Conservator (03)  CAnadian Conservation Institute (08)  Hagley Fellow and Conference coordinator (13)  Hagley Museum and Library

19.

CLAVIR, M. Preserving what is valued: museums, conservation, and First Nations [online]. S.l.: UBC Press, 2002. UBC Museum of Anthropology research publication. ISBN 9780774808613. Available from: http://books.google.com.au/books?id=ZlQb2Q5Q4TkC.

2002405175

1.

COBLE, Wendy. Management of historic ships and aircraft sites. In: CRM online: cultural resource management. 2002, Vol. 25, no. 2, pp. 34–36.

0001

Describes the US Department of the Navy’s Naval Historical Center (NHC). The Navy has custody and is responsible for all their historic sites, which include ship and aircraft wrecks. The preservation and study of these sites is encouraged by the Navy, but no salvage is allowed unless a permit is obtained. Of special concern are the problems of illegal tampering, including the dangers of unexploded munitions and loss of information due to looting. NHC’s goals are educating the public about looting and from time to time intervening to regain lost or stolen items. Bianca Taubert

2.

COHEN, S., NAOR, D., RAMATI, L. and RESHEF, P. Towards OAIS-Based Preservation Aware Storage. S.l.: IBM Haifa Labs, 2006.

0002

3.

COLE, IS, KING, GA, TRINIDAD, GS, CHAN, WY and PATERSON, DA. An australia-wide map of corrosivity: a gis approach. In: Eighth International Conference on Durability of Building Materials and Components, 8 dbmc. S.l.: s.n., 1999. pp. 901–911.

0003

4.

CONSERVATION, International Symposium on the, PROPERTY, Restoration of Cultural and KENKYUJO, Tokyo Kokuritsu Bunkazai. Conservation of industrial collections, November 4-November 6, 1998 / International Symposium on the Conservation and Restoration of Cultural Property. S.l.: Tokyo National Research Institute of Cultural Properties, Tokyo :, 1998.

0000

5.

COROTIS, R.B., ELLIS, J.H. and JIANG, M. Modeling of risk-based inspection, maintenance and life-cycle cost with partially observable Markov decision processes. In: Structure and Infrastructure Engineering. 2005, Vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 75–84.

0015

6.

COROTIS, Ross B, HUGH ELLIS, J and JIANG, Mingxiang. Modeling of risk-based inspection, maintenance and life-cycle cost with partially observable Markov decision processes. In: Structure and Infrastructure Engineering [online]. 2005, Vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 75–84. DOI 10.1080/15732470412331289305. Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15732470412331289305.

0015

The utilization of Markov decision processes as a sequential decision algorithm in the management actions of infrastructure (inspection, maintenance and repair) is discussed. The realistic issue of partial information from inspection is described, and the classic approach of partially observable Markov decision processes is then introduced. The use of this approach to determine optimal inspection strategies is described, as well as the role of deterioration and maintenance for steel structures. Discrete structural shapes and maintenance actions provide a tractable approach. In-service inspection incorporates Bayesian updating and leads to optimal operation and initial design. Finally, the concept of management policy is described with strategy vectors. The utilization of Markov decision processes as a sequential decision algorithm in the management actions of infrastructure (inspection, maintenance and repair) is discussed. The realistic issue of partial information from inspection is described, and the classic approach of partially observable Markov decision processes is then introduced. The use of this approach to determine optimal inspection strategies is described, as well as the role of deterioration and maintenance for steel structures. Discrete structural shapes and maintenance actions provide a tractable approach. In-service inspection incorporates Bayesian updating and leads to optimal operation and initial design. Finally, the concept of management policy is described with strategy vectors.

7.

CORPORATION, CORTEC. VCI Packaging Products: corrosion-inhibiting materials for effective, low-cost protection of ferrous and non-ferrous metals. S.l.: s.n., [no date].

0000

(05) Advertising brochure (27) “Clenching” plastic folder

8.

CREAGH, D. C and BRADLEY, D. A. Radiation in Art and Archeometry [online]. S.l.: Elsevier Science, 2000. ISBN 9780444504876. Available from: http://books.google.com.au/books?id=PbG-IbGbB8cC.

9.

CREAGH, D. C. The characterization of artefacts of cultural heritage significance using physical techniques. In: Radiation Physics and Chemistry. 2005, Vol. 74, no. 6, pp. 426–442.

0005

Cited By (since 1996): 1

10.

D.P, Doyle and H.P, Godard. A Rapid Method for Determining the Corrosivity of the Atmosphere at any Location. In: Nature. 21 December 1963, Vol. 200, no. 4912, pp. pp.1167–1168.

0003

Describes how Sample’s `wire-on-bolt’ test (measurement of galvanic corrosion of metals) can be used to provide a numerical assessment of corrosivity of the atmosphere in a period as short as three months.

F: PBS Record: 210; O: (42) Have photocopy

11.

DEFENCE, DEPARTMENT OF. WATER DISPLACING FLUID P X 112. In: AUSTRALIAN DEFENCE SPECIFICATION. May 1958, no. ASD.193-17-1002, pp. AUSTRALIA.

0002

THIS SPECIFICATION COVERS THE REQUIREMENTS OF A WATER DISPLACING FLUID, INTENDED FOR SUCH USES AS THE SALVAGING OF “DROWNED” VEHICLES, THE PROTECTION FO WATER SPACES FO I.C. ENGINES DURING STORAGE, AND THE DRYING OF ARTICLES AFTER AQUEOUS CLEANING PROCEDURES.

12.

DEFENCE, DEPARTMENT OF. CORROSION PREVENTIVE COMPOUND PX115 (THIXOTROPIC). In: January 1960, pp. AUSTRALIA.

0000

THIS SPECIFICATION COVERS THE REQUIREMENTS OF A THICHENED OIL TYPE TEMPORARY CORROSION PREVENTIVE AND LUBRICANT SPECIALLY FORMULATED TO PROTECT CRITICAL SURFACES OF ENGINES, GEARBOXES AND OTHER SIMILAR COMPONENTS AGAINST RUSTING WHILE IN LONG TERM STORAGE.

13.

DEGRIGNY, Christian. Conservation et stabilisation d’alliages d’aluminium prélevés sur des épaves aéronautiques immergées en eau douce: les conditions du traitement électrolytique. In: Conservation restauration des biens culturels: revue de l’ARAAFU. 1991, no. 3, pp. 27–39.

Accelerated atmospheric corrosion of aircraft parts made of aluminum alloys, taken from underwater wreckage, is mainly due to the presence of chloride ions within the materials. An imposed potential cathodic polarization treatment is proposed to extract these ions rapidly. The corrosion phenomena occurring while the treatment is taking place (pit and cathode corrosion) are studied and experimental conditions are optimized to prevent their occurrence and increase the efficiency of the dechloridization. The procedures adopted vary according to the type of aircraft material considered. Author Abstract Michele Buchholz

14.

DEGRIGNY, Christian. Stabilisation de moteurs d’avions immergés. In: Studies in conservation. 1995, Vol. 40, no. 1, pp. 10–18.

Treatment to stabilize aluminum alloys deriving from submerged aeronautic remains by cathodic polarization in sodium citrate solution extends to the associated composite systems comprising iron alloys. Due to galvanic corrosion, the steel is covered with a thin layer of corrosion which must be eliminated without damaging the aluminum alloys in contact with it. It is therefore proposed to add to the usual treatment by chemical and electrolytic methods a new corrosion removal step for the ferrous parts, using a corrosion-inhibiting solution for aluminum alloys. The conditions for treatment--solution concentration, cathodic potential applied, the need for good agitation--are described in the case of a BMW 801 D2 engine from a Focke-Wulf 190 plane which was submerged for 45 years in the river Le Loiret. Author Abstract

15.

DELL, Chris. Restoration, preservation or ruination. In: Classics & Motorcycle Mechanics. January 1991,

0000

The problem ofthe `originality’ phobia

16.

DEMPWOLF, Thomas. Industrial heritage conservation: the historic diesel power station in Wustermark. In: The object in context: crossing conservation boundaries: contributions to the Munich Congress, 28 August-1 September 2006. United Kingdom: International Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works, 2006. pp. 76–81. ISBN 0-9548169-1-9.

The historic Wustermark, Germany, diesel power station is a unique industrial monument and part of a marshaling yard dating back to 1909 that is still in existence today. A fully preserved diesel engine connected to a generator and electrical switch gear mounted on marble panels form the heart of a well-documented and traceable early power supply. A comparison of site documentation with technology history sources proved the integrity of the ensemble. Industrial archaeology facilitated tracing the history of the site and changes to it. Scientific research proved that the oil-based coatings are original and provided a solution for dealing with their degradation. Oral history supplied evidence about maintenance by former employees, still carried out some 25 years after the historical power supply had been shut down. Research was carried out in order to establish a comprehensive, convincing conservation plan and techniques for preserving the monument in its context. Author Abstract

17.

DEVEREUX, L Wilson and G, R S. The Effect of Some Water-displacing Corrosion Preventatives on Corrosion of Aluminium Alloys 7075-T651 and 2024-T6. In: Materials Report. Vol. 115.

0000

The effectiveness of six commerical water-displacing corrosion preventive formulations in inhibiting corrosion of two aluminium alloys used in aircraft construction has been investigated.

1.

DIMLA SNR., Dimla E. Sensor signals for tool-wear monitoring in metal cutting operations—a review of methods. In: International Journal of Machine Tools and Manufacture [online]. June 2000, Vol. 40, no. 8, pp. 1073–1098. DOI 10.1016/S0890-6955(99)00122-4. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0890695599001224.

0030

The state of a cutting tool is an important factor in any metal cutting process as additional costs in terms of scrapped components, machine tool breakage and unscheduled downtime result from worn tool usage. Several methods to develop monitoring devices for observing the wear levels on the cutting tool on-line while engaged in cutting have been attempted. This paper presents a review of some of the methods that have been employed in tool condition monitoring. Particular attention is paid to the manner in which sensor signals from the cutting process have been harnessed and used in the development of tool condition monitoring systems (TCMSs).

2.

DINSMORE O. R JR. Protection Problems Encountered in Storing Military Equipment. In: Materials Protection. January 1962, Vol. 1, no. 1, pp. pp.66–73.

0000

Discusses methods of protecting tugs, landing craft and rail equipment from sea water and atmospheric exposure at Charleston, S.C. so that this military equipment can be returned to service in case of a national emergency in a minimum of time.

undefined (42)  Have photocopy

3.

DONOVAN, P. D. Protection of Metals From Corrosion in Storage and Transit. Chichester, England.: Ellis Horwood Limited., 1986.

0019

This book presents the problems of corrosion and the principles of protection in storage and transit so that they may be seen in relation to a wide range of engineering disciplines and designs. In giving an insight into the scientific background and the basic mechanisms involved and encountered with widely-used engineering metals, the author traces the hazards of metals from corrosion in manufacture, transit and storage, through the point where goods reach their final destination. The necessary theory of corrosion is provided in sufficient detail to establish a sound understanding of the combat against corrosion.

4.

EMORY L. KEMP. Historic preservation of engineering works : Proceedings. In: Engineering Foundation Conference. 1978. N. Y.: American society of civil engineers, 1981. pp. vii, 321.

0004

LC Control No.: 81069030; Cataloging Source: Uk eng Uk; Conf.; Source: UCB 2007

5.

EYDELNANT, A., MIKSIC, B., RUSSELL, S., CORPS, C. and LOUIS, F. Use of Volatile Inhibitors (VCIs) for Aircraft Protection. In: Commander Corps and Fort Louis AFZH-DEQ, Fort Louis WA. 1993, pp. 98433–5000.

6.

FÄGERBORG, Eva. In search of the human element: a methodological approach. In: Industrial heritage, Austria 1987: TICCIH 1987, the Sixth International Conference on the Conservation of the Industrial Heritage, Austria 6th-12th September 1987. Transactions 2, Conference papers and results. Belgium: The International Committee for the Conservation of the Industrial Heritage, 1990. pp. 214–216.

Considers the importance of social history and industrial archaeology, and states that history of the work force is not a sideline but a central part of any research. The author contemplates how workers play a strong role in the development of processes, and does not only view them as supplying the manpower to carry out manual work dictated by owners and managers. ICCROM

7.

G. A. HEATH, A. J. EDWARDS, M. STERNS, G. BAILEY and V. OTIENO-ALEGO. “Crystals from an aged Merlin.” Corrosion deposits found in the engines of the historic Avro-Lancaster bomber G-for-George,. In: Conservation Science 2002. S.l.: Archetype Publications Ltd,

0000

8.

G. J.O WALLACE. Industrial Collections. In: Conservation News. July 1988, Vol. 36, pp. 9.

0013

9.

GUEX, François. Das Schweizerische Inventar der Kulturguter von nationaler und regionaler Bedeutung. In: KGS Forum = Forum PBC. 2002, no. 2, pp. 36–41.

Among other things, Article 5 of the Second Protocol provides for inventories to be drawn up as a precautionary cultural property protection measure. In 1988 and 1995, Switzerland published an “Inventory of Cultural Property of National and Regional Importance,” listing an extensive range of cultural objects. This inventory is currently being revised; its updated version should appear in 2005. The aim is to set up a new list of cultural property accounting for the heritage only recognized in recent years, such as industrial and transport-related constructions and 20th-century architecture, and to clearly define and systematically apply criteria allowing for the inclusion of an object in such an inventory. To be fully reliable, these inventories must be based on well-defined criteria. Classifying a piece of cultural property is not an end in itself. It serves to determine the timeframe within which measures to protect the object in question should be taken and the importance of the work involved. Author Abstract ICCROM Marc Giudicelli

10.

HALLAM, D., THURROWGOOD, D., OTIENO-ALEGO, V. and CREAGH, D. An EIS method for assessing thin oil films used in museums. In: Metal 04: proceedings of the International Conference on Metals Conservation = actes de la conférence internationale sur la conservation des métaux, Canberra, Australia, 4-8 October 2004. Australia: National Museum of Australia, 2004. pp. 388–399. ISBN 1-876944-33-1.

Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is a well established technique for evaluating the corrosion preventive properties of protective coatings. National Museum of Australia (NMA) staff has used this technique in the past to evaluate and rank the corrosion performance of a number of commercial waxy coatings in routine conservation use. This testing procedure is relatively simple and gives quantitative snapshot data about the performance of protective coatings, allowing them to be ranked objectively. The EIS test cell presently available is suitable for testing relatively hard, thick coatings. It cannot be used in the investigation of thin, delicate, and easy-to-break films such as those formed by engine oil. The objective of this investigation was to fabricate an electrode suitable for testing thin oily films using conventional EIS test cells. An EIS method was desired that could be used for rapidly testing commercial engine oils and ranking their performance. Such a test protocol is particularly crucial to NMA staff, who aim to identify the best engine oils for use in their functional collection of technological objects and for developing a “just noticeable wear” criteria for use in museums. Author Abstract ICCROM Maria Corsino

11.

HALLAM, D.L., ADAMS, C.D., BAILEY, G. and HEATH, G.A. Redefining the electrochemical treatment of historic aluminium objects. In: Metal 95: proceedings of the International Conference on Metals Conservation. United Kingdom: Earthscan Ltd., 1997. pp. 220–222. ISBN 1-873936-67-2.

The use of electroanalytical techniques to redefine the conditions appropriate for the electrolytic conservation treatment of aluminum exposed to saline environments is discussed. Corrosion rates of the aluminum alloy in various saline, citrate, and inhibitor solutions are examined by Tafel, polarization resistance, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. The experimental stability domain for the aluminum is mapped in citrate using potentiodynamic curves. The experimental Pourbaix diagram is compared to those proposed by Christian Degrigny and found to be quite different. A new inhibitor system for the treatment of composite aluminum ferrous items is proposed. Degrigny’s proposed pH range for treatment is discussed and modified for the alloys treated. The use of DC corrosion measurement techniques are supplemented with some AC impedance measurements at rest and with applied potentials. The results are discussed. Author Abstract

12.

HALLAM, David and BAILEY, George T. Corrosion inhibitors for aluminium. In: AICCM national newsletter. March 1991, no. 38, pp. 5–6.

0000

This report is the result of a research project undertaken as part of student work experience at the Australian War Memorial during January-February 1990. The project aimed at preventing corrosion of the substantial collection of relics with aluminum-based components. The project applied various inhibitors to corroded aluminum samples and exposed them to corrosive conditions. The effectiveness of the inhibitors was measured by noting the weight changes of the samples over a two-week period.

13.

HALLAM, David, THURROWGOOD, David, OTIENO-ALEGO, Vincent, CREAGH, Dudley, VIDUKA, Andrew and HEATH, Graham. Studies of commercial protective petrochemical coatings on ferrous surfaces of historical and museum objects. In: Metal 2001: proceedings of the international conference on metals conservation = Actes de la conférence internationale sur la conservation des métaux = Actas del congreso internacional sobre la conservacion de metales: Santiago, Chile 2-6 April 2001. Australia: Western Australian Museum, 2004. pp. 297–303. ISBN 1-920843-17-5.

A variety of petroleum-based waxy coatings have been used extensively by conservators for the preservation of objects of cultural heritage significance. These coatings must be able to be applied and removed without damaging surfaces and must be robust enough to withstand museum use. The coating life and method of failure should be predictable. Commercially available waxy coatings and oil films were compared to the standard BSq 195 hot melt microcrystalline wax coating in a series of ASTM B117[8] salt spray tests and ranked using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The mode of coating failure was assessed. This report also reviews the conservators’ experience with application of petrochemical coatings on ferrous metals and their use in museum environments. Application of coatings to the conservation of functional objects is reported using two operational examples from the National Museum of Australia’s collection. Author Abstract

14.

HALLAM, John Carstairs. The preservation of working machinery: ethical, practical and legal problems for conservators and curators. In: Restauration, dé-restauration, re-restauration: colloque sur la conservation, restauration des biens culturels, Paris - 5, 6 et 7 Octobre 1995. France: Association des restaurateurs d’art et d’archéologie de formation universitaire, 1995. pp. 307–326. ISBN 2-907465-03-1.

Working exhibits form a major element of museum and private collections. During its working life, a machine was subject to regimes of maintenance, repair, alteration, or adaptation to meet commercial needs. Once discarded as obsolete, dangerous, or uneconomic to operate or repair, it was usually scrapped. Many have been restored several times, been converted into forms which the original manufacturer would not recognize, or undergone major repairs or alterations to satisfy new safety and other legislation. Should historic machinery continue to be operated? Should we de-restore a conversion, or is it part of the history of the artifact? How can we reconcile safety with originality? Will the techniques and materials for maintenance and operation be available in the future? Is everything to be considered consumable, with the conservator merely extending the working life of a machine? Examples of past and current practice illustrate answers and mistakes which have been proposed for working exhibits. These include the proposal of a grading system to identify key exhibits; improved training at all levels; the establishment of codes of practice; and the construction of replicas and demonstration equipment to protect original material. Author Abstract

15.

HERMANN KUHN. The restoration of Historic Technological Artifacts, Scientific Instruments and Tools. In: The International Journal of Museum Management and Curatorship. 1989, Vol. 8, pp. 389–405.

0000

16.

HUGHES, Karen E. and LOUDEN, Elizabeth I. Bridging the gap: using 3-D laser scanning in historic-building documentation. In: APT bulletin. 2005, Vol. 36, no. 2-3, pp. 37–46.

Discusses the use of 3-D laser scanning as a means to document historic buildings, reviewing the development of the scanner technology. Originally used primarily in an engineering environment, the 3-D laser scanner was used to produce as-built drawings of industrial facilities to a high degree of accuracy. The scanner produces point clouds, or large numbers of points in space, which define the object being scanned. These are processed and imported into CAD software to produce drawings. Until recently, computer hardware and software for this purpose was prohibitively expensive for the heritage field. The authors consider the suitability of the technology for heritage application, presenting three case studies to illustrate its utility. The first case study is the Continental Grain Company facility in Brownsville, Texas. Built in 1891, it played an important role in the local agricultural community. The project involved documenting the facility and producing drawings to the standard of the Historic American Building Survey, Historic American Engineering Record, and the Historic American Landscape Survey (HABS/HAER/HALS). The second example is the documentation of the Bluff Dale Bridge in Bluff Dale, Texas, built in 1891, a 140-foot span cable-stayed suspension bridge. The third case involved producing 3-D models and architectural drawings of three roadside parks and objects at eight other parks for the Historic Roadside Parks Initiative, which was dedicated to documenting characteristic roadside parks from the 1930s and 1940s. The authors conclude that 3-D laser scanning has proven to be an important and necessary tool for preservation documentation. This is qualified by the observation that turning raw scanner data into drawings is the most difficult aspect of the process, but they note that the strong commercial demand for the development of the technology will continue to benefit the heritage sector. Mitchell Hearns Bishop

17.

J.A.ASHTON, D.L.HALLAM, D.C.CREAGH, G.A.HEATH, G.BAILEY, C.D.ADAMS and A. HOLT, S. InSitu testing of the integrity of protective wax coatings on memorials. In: Thirteenth international Corrosion Conference; Towards Corrosion Prevention. Melbourne: s.n., 1996.

0000

18.

JEREMIAH, D. The formation and legacy of Britain’s first motor museum. In: Journal of the History of Collections [online]. 1 January 1998, Vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 93–112. [Accessed 25 March 2012]. DOI 10.1093/jhc/10.1.93. Available from: http://jhc.oxfordjournals.org/gca?allch=citmgr&submit=Go&gca=hiscol%3B10%2F1%2F93&gca=hiscol%3B7%2F2%2F251.

19.

JEREMIAH, D. Museums and the History and Heritage of British Motoring. In: International Journal of Heritage Studies. 2003, Vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 151–168.

20.

JIACONG, Z.F.Z.X.H. A Novel Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy Sensor for On-line Measurement of Water Content in Oil. In: Lubrication Engineering. 2011, pp. 05.

0001

21.

JOHN KEMISTER. An identity crisis: Hawker Sea Fury FB11 VX730. In: S.l.: s.n.,

0000

This paper looks at the role of original paint and other fabric in discovering the identity and history of the Memorial’s Hawker Sea Fury aircraft.

22.

KING, G.A. and O’BRIEN, D.J. The influence of marine environments on metals and fabricated coated metal products, freely exposed and partially sheltered. In: ASTM special technical publication. 1995, Vol. 1239, pp. 167–167.

0014

23.

KING, GA. Corrosivity mapping–A novel tool for materials selection and asset management. In: Materials Performance. 1995, Vol. 34, no. 1.

0011

24.

KING, GA, SASNAITIS, I. and TERRILL, S. Environmental factors influencing the corrosivity of Melbourne’s atmosphere. In: NTIS, SPRINGFIELD, VA(USA). 1985. 1985,

0004

25.

KING, G A. ASSESSMENT OF THE CORROSIVITY OF THE ATMOSPHERE IN AN INTENSIVE PIGGERY USING “CLIMATE” TESTERS. In: Corr. Australasia. October 1987, Vol. 12, no. 5, pp. 14–15.

Since problems exist with the durability of certain metals used in intensive pig housing, CLIMATE testers have been used to measure the corrosivity of the atmosphere of an intensive piggery. Extremely low “indices” were obtained. The results are compared with some obtained from several other locations.

1.

L. O., Leugner. Use of Sediment Tests and Wear Metals Analysis to Monitor Hydraulic System Condition. In: Lubrication Engineering. May 1987, Vol. 43, no. 5, pp. pp.365–369.

0000

Discusses the use of sediment tests and wear metal analysis to monitor the condition of hydraulic system.

undefined (42)  Have photocopy

2.

LEMAR, R. L. Rock Island Arsenal Laboratory. S.l. Department of the Army, 1958.

0002

Literature survey on VCI,s up to 1958.Comprehensive

undefined (23)  58-2834 (27)  photocopy (37)  dlh,cal

3.

LOANE, C. M and GAYNOR, J. W. Bearing Corrosion Characteristics of Lubricating oils. In: Ind. Eng. Chem. Anal. Ed. 1945, Vol. 17, pp. 89.

0000

(42) not yet recieved

4.

LUND, C. E and ERICKSON, M. L. Bibliography on dehumidified storage and dehumidification. S.l. University of Minnesota, Dept. of Navy, Bureau of Yards and Docks., 1954.

0000

Bibliography on dehumidified storage and dehumidification

undefined (03)  University of Minnesota (23)  NOy 79585 (27)  photocopy (37)  CAL,DLH

5.

MACLEOD, Ian D. Stabilization of corroded aluminum. In: Studies in conservation. 1983, Vol. 28, no. 1, pp. 1–7.

0020

A simple washing procedure has been developed for stabilization of corroding aluminum-copper alloys. The use of an ammonia-ammonium sulfate buffer at pH 9.6 in aerated deionized water effectively removes cemented copper metal and copper corrosion products from the surface of the object while also removing aggressive chloride ions. This treatment has been used to stabilize a Duralumin sea-plane float which was actively corroding after 46 years’ exposure to a marine environment.

6.

MANN, P R. Implications of Using Vehicles. In: Road Transport Collection, Science Museum, London. 6 November 1989, pp. London.

0001

The question of whether museum objects should be demonstrated

7.

MARIĆ, G. and IVUŠIĆ, V. MONITORING OF FOUR-STROKE ENGINE WEAR BY OIL ANALYSES. In: Goriva i maziva. 2002, Vol. 41, no. 2.

0000

8.

MARK CLAYTON and ASSOCIATION, Australian Aviation Museums. Proceedings of the Inaugural Australian Aviation Museums Conference held at the NSW State Library, Sydney November 1-3, 1989 / edited by Mark Clayton. S.l.: Australian Aviation Museums Association with the assistance of National Air & Space Museum of Australia, [Port Arthur, Tas.] :, 1990. ISBN 0646016938.

9.

Risks and Rewards: Perspectives on operating Mechanical Artifacts. In: Risks and Rewards: Perspectives on operating Mechanical Artifacts. Hagley Museum and Library: Hagley Museum and Library, 22 February 1991.

0000

Conference Proceedings

10.

MARTIN, KG and KING, G. Corrosivity measurements at some Australian cities. In: K. G. Martin and G. A. King, CSIRO Div. Bldg. Res. Highett Victoria 3190. Corr. Aust. 1981, Vol. 6, no. 4.

0005

11.

MEEHAN, P.M. Is reversibility an option when conserving industrial collections. In: Reversibility–Does it exists. 1999, pp. 11–15.

0002

12.

MERRI FERRELL. History in details: Preserving the original. In: MARK G MAPES (ed.), Risks and Rewards: Perspectives on operating Mechanical Artifacts. Hagley Museum and Library: Hagley Museum and Library, 1991. pp. pp 42–50.

0000

undefined (02)  Curator of Carrige Collections (03)  Museums at Stony Brook (08)  Hagley Fellow and Conference coordinator (13)  Hagley Museum and Library

13.

MICHELL, R. Which Oil?: Choosing the Right Oil and Grease for Your Antique, Vintage, Veteran, Classic Or Collector Car. S.l.: Veloce, 2011.

0000

14.

MIERMON, Agnès Gelbert and VUISSOZ, Annick. The conservation of polymers used in horology since the end of the 19th century: a multidisciplinary approach. In: Plastics: looking at the future and learning from the past: papers from the conference held at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London: 23-25 May 2007. United Kingdom: Archetype Publications Ltd., 2008. pp. 36–44. ISBN 978-1-904982-43-2 (pbk.).

0000

Since the 19th century, polymers have slowly been introduced into horology, and almost all parts of timepieces have used these new materials since the 1960s. Integration of plastic means that conservators face new problems and raises issues about the choices to be made before any intervention and about the intervention methods themselves. The University of Applied Sciences of Western Switzerland, located in the area known as “Watch Valley,” has necessarily developed an interest in timepiece heritage and preservation. The university is currently engaged in a research project to understand more clearly the impact of plastic integration in the field of horology and to develop techniques of polymer conservation. This study presents some results of the multidisciplinary project involving conservators, historians, ethnologists, and chemists. The research is based on historical and ethnographic inquiries conducted in the Jura region industries and on the study of objects selected from the collections of the Musée international d’horlogerie (MIH) of La Chaux-de-Fonds. Results show how the introduction of plastic, a bottom-of-the-range material, brings a complete change in the industrial organization, socioeconomic context, and representations of watches and plastics. The technical section includes identification and conservation of plastics contained in the selected artifacts. Author Abstract

15.

MIKESH, R. C. How to Maintain Museum Aircraft Outdoors. S.l.: s.n., 1989.

0000

Monograph prepared by the National Air and Space Museum of the Smithsonian Institution which describes the problems of protecting museum aircraft from deterioration when they must be placed outdoors. Recommendations are given for the preservation of aircraft in the outdoor environment.

F: PBS Record: 410; O: (05) Lopez, D. (26) 58 pgs. (42) Have

16.

MIKESH, Robert. Restoring Museum Aircraft. Shrewsbury, England: Airlife, 1997. ISBN 1 85310 875 8.

0000

17.

MINISTRY OF DEFENCE. 05-50(PART 31)/lSSUE 1: METHODS FOR TESTING FUELS, LUBRICANTS AND ASSOCIATED PRODUCTS. S.l. 1988.

0000

This Part of the Standard is referred to in Defence Standards (Def Stan) for the corrosion preventive properties of lubricating oil, eg Joint Service Designations OM-12 and OX-14.

18.

MINNS J. A Restoration Viewpoint. In: Steaming, The Magazine of the National Traction Engine Trust. Winter, /89 1988, Vol. 32, no. 1, pp. pp.30–31.

0088

Discusses the restoration of traction engines.

undefined (42)  Have photocopy

19.

MONCRIEFF, A. Conservation of Industrial Collections. In: Conservation News. 1989, no. 38, pp. Pgs.19–20.

0003

Discusses the diversity of industrial collections and the training for conservators of such collections.

(42) Have

20.

MOORMAN, J.W. Breakdown of Preservative Fluid MIL-PRF-46170 in Aircraft Hydraulic Systems. S.l. DTIC Document, 2001.

0001

21.

MORGAN, David. Heritage railways in the 21st century. In: Historic environment. July 2008, Vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 32–36.

0000

Interest in, and support for, heritage railways remains extraordinarily strong in the UK. There are over 100 heritage lines, railway museums, and steam centers in Britain and Ireland, and in 2004 over 12 million passenger journeys were made on steam trains. The problems and issues needing to be addressed are broadly similar across Europe and around the world. This article focuses on three main areas: the cultural aspect of railway preservation, including the adoption of the Riga Charter; safety and regulation; and insurance and inspection. If rail heritage organizations are to persuade governments and fiscal authorities that they should receive favorable tax treatment, it is important that they demonstrate that their activities fulfill a public role benefiting the community. They need to show that they do indeed preserve industrial heritage, but equally importantly, the traditional skills that go with it. The issue of safety has tended to overwhelm paternalistic national regulators. However, heritage railways do not require safeguards identical to those appropriate for modern high-speed operators. The third issue is the ever tightening insurance market and the steps being taken in Europe to mitigate the effects of large payouts following terrorist atrocities and other major incidents. Author Abstract

22.

MUÑOZ VIÑAS, Salvador. Contemporary theory of conservation. In: Reviews in conservation. 2002, no. 3, pp. 25–34.

0015

Classical conservation theories (from Ruskin to Brandi) are characterized by their close adherence to Truth. These theories are currently dominant, but criticism and new alternatives are developing and gaining momentum. Three crucial notions in classical theories have been criticized: reversibility, universality, and objectivity (including objective determination of damage and the notion of scientific conservation). As a result of these criticisms, emerging contemporary theory of conservation has substituted the notion of function, use, or value of the conservation object for that of Truth. A representative list of sources is discussed. Author Abstract

23.

Contemporary theory of conservation. United Kingdom: Elsevier Butterworth-Heinemann, 2005. ISBN 0-7506-6224-7.

0065

Reviews, summarizes, and elaborates on the most contemporary manifestations of conservation theory. While variable and sometimes conflicting in opinion, classical theories had one objective in common: they sought to reveal the truth. However, since the 1980s, notions of truth and objectivity have experienced a steady decline, which has led many people to feel increasingly uncomfortable with the classical discourse of conservation. The contemporary theory addressed in this book answers those problems by introducing new concepts, such as those of communicative efficiency, sustainability, and flexibility. These new concepts are much more akin to the “common sense” approach that most conservators actually apply when making decisions regarding heritage. Thus, the author writes, contemporary theory of conservation is nothing more (and nothing less) than “a revolution of common sense.” [Editor’s note: for the Spanish-language version of this book, see AATA 38-2369.] Salvador Muñoz Viñas

24.

MYSHKIN, N.K., MARKOVA, L.V., SEMENYUK, M.S., KONG, H., HAN, H.-G. and YOON, E.-S. Wear monitoring based on the analysis of lubricant contamination by optical ferroanalyzer. In: Wear [online]. August 2003, Vol. 255, no. 7–12, pp. 1270–1275. DOI 10.1016/S0043-1648(03)00175-3. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0043164803001753.

0018

Lubricant contamination analysis is one of the common and prospective methods of machine condition monitoring. Wear debris formed in rubbing is a source of valuable information on the wear mechanism and severity, while total oil contamination gives information on oil lubricity. Development of new methods and means of reliable condition monitoring of friction units remains a challenging task for rating the condition of equipment, reducing losses for idle time or failures, and saving lubricants. Despite the fact that direct reading (DR) ferrograph was proposed more than 20 years ago its main principle—accumulation and estimation of deposited particles content—underlies the basis of creation of new effective built-in devices and criteria for condition monitoring. In the presented paper, the principle of operation of the optical ferroanalyzer (OF) jointly developed by V.A. Belyi Metal-Polymer Research Institute of Belarus National Academy of Sciences and Korea Institute of Science and Technology is presented. Optical ferroanalyzer in addition to ferrograph allows us to estimate total contamination of oil, increasing reliability of tribosystem condition monitoring. The results of bench tests of the analyzer are described and example of its application for condition monitoring of engine is shown.

25.

NEWELL, Dianne C. Handling the material culture of the industrial past. In: Historic preservation of engineering works: proceedings of an Engineering Foundation conference held at Franklin Pierce College, Rindge, New Hampshire, June 25-30, 1978. United States: American Society of Civil Engineers, 1981. pp. 48–67. ISBN 0872622789 (pbk.).

New behavioral and scientific directions in studying the human past, and more socially responsible objectives in museum and historic preservation work, point the way for industrial archaeologists to go beyond simply sampling industrial and engineering relics. Specifically, industrial archaeology inventories routinely approach physical objects as interesting only in themselves. This approach underestimates the potential of sites and artifacts to serve as evidence, for example, of past human behavior. With a systematic and explicitly behavioral approach to classification, however, investigators can begin exploring the dynamic spatial and historical context of industrial archaeology materials, using these materials to examine important questions about the human past. Author Abstract

26.

NEWEY, Hazel and MEEHAN, Peter. The conservation of an 1895 Panhard et Levassor and a 1922 prototype Austin seven motorcar: New approaches in the preservation of vehicles. In: The Conservator [online]. January 1999, Vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 11–21. [Accessed 21 May 2012]. DOI 10.1080/01410096.1999.9995134. Available from: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01410096.1999.9995134.

0003

27.

OTIENO-ALEGO, V., D.C.CREAGH, G.A.HEATH and D.L.HALLAM. Evaluation of the anti-corrosion performance of petroleum sulfonates in wax coatings. In: Corrosion and Prevention Conference 97. Brisbane: Australian Corrosion Association Inc., 1997. pp. Paper 019.

0000

28.

OTIENO-ALEGO, Vincent, HALLAM, David, HEATH, Graham and CREAGH, Dudley. Electrochemical evaluation of the anti-corrosion performance of waxy coatings for outdoor bronze conservation. In: Metal 98: proceedings of the International Conference on Metals Conservation = Actes de la conférence internationale sur la conservation des métaux: Draguignan-Figanières, France, 27-29 May 1998. United Kingdom: Earthscan Ltd., 1998. pp. 309–314. ISBN 1-873936-82-6.

The corrosion performance of five commercial waxy coatings for long-term protection of outdoor bronze sculptures was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) as a function of immersion time in neutral aerated 0.1 M NaCl solution. Each translucent coating met the special requirement defined for the field of conservation, i.e., the coating treatment should be repairable and reversible even after aging and have minimal impact on the aesthetic attributes of the sculpture surface. The performance of these coatings was compared with that of conventional microcrystalline wax Besq 195 favored by conservators. Impedance spectra were fitted to an equivalent circuit using a complex nonlinear least-squares program, and the calculated pore resistance (R) was used as a numerical indicator for ranking the coatings. The results suggest that Dinitrol 4010 and Cor-Trol 450 coatings have superior corrosion protection than Besq 195, and their potential use in conservation is discussed. Additional tests are underway to quantify the performance of these promising coatings on patinated bronze surfaces exposed to a coastal industrial environment. Author Abstract

29.

OTIENO-ALEGO, Vincent, HALLAM, Vincent, VIDUKA, Andrew, HEATH, Graham and CREAGH, Dudley. Electrochemical impedance studies of the corrosion resistance of wax coatings on artificially patinated bronze. In: Metal 98: proceedings of the International Conference on Metals Conservation = Actes de la conférence internationale sur la conservation des métaux: Draguignan-Figanières, France, 27-29 May 1998. United Kingdom: Earthscan Ltd., 1998. pp. 315–319. ISBN 1-873936-82-6.

Three commercial waxes have been studied as protective coatings for sculptural bronzes. The bronzes had been artificially patinated by three different processes. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to established the effectiveness of these wax coatings on each of the patinated surfaces. It is found that artificial patinas by themselves offer little corrosion protection to the base metal, and that some combinations of wax and patination type are significantly better than others. As well, we present preliminary data on bronze specimens which had been naturally aged in a coastal industrial environment. Author Abstract

30.

OTIENO-ALEGO, Vincent, THURROWGOOD, David, CREAGH, Dudley C. and BAILEY, George. Disodium salt of secacic acid: a non-toxic corrosion inhibitor for ferrous artefacts in citric acid wash solutions. In: TOWNSEND, Joyce H, EREMIN, Katherine and ADRIAENS, Annemie (eds.). London; United Kingdom: Archetype Publications Ltd., 2003. pp. 162–167. ISBN 1-873132-88-3.

0000

Citric acid solution moderated with thiourea is a standard conservation treatment for chemically cleaning ferrous artifacts. The acid is washed from objects after stripping to prevent recorrosion during display and storage. Widely used inhibitors in the wash solutions have been those based on chromate and nitrite ions. However, these chemical species are highly toxic, and their use produces serious environmental hazards. This report explores the use of the disodium salt of secacic acid (1,8-octanedicarboyxlic acid) as an alternative low-toxicity, relatively inexpensive, and environmentally benign inhibitor to chromate in rinse solutions for citric acid-stripped mild steel. Gravimetric tests using corroded mild steel samples establish the disodium salt as an effective inhibitor provided a prerinse step is adopted in the wash procedure. Under these conditions, the dicarboxylate was found to have comparable corrosion protection to chromate. Realistic trials with typical metallic artifacts including composites were successful, strongly suggesting the potential use of this inhibitor for treating different metals and metal alloys. Additional tests show that the dicarboxylate treatment is compatible with subsequent surface treatments such as waxing.

31.

PAULI, Robert A. State of Plastic Media Blasting (Dry Stripping) of Aircraft. In: SAE The Engineering Resource for Advancing Mobility. 10 February 1986, pp. Seattle, Washington.

0000

The corrosive effect of the chemicals on steel containers caused rapid deterioration

(42) 22nd Annual Airline Plating and Metal Finishing Forum

32.

PEARSON, C. The preservation of iron cannon after 200 years under the sea. In: Studies in conservation. 1972, pp. 91–110.

0011

33.

PEARSON, Colin. Conservation of marine archaeological objects. In: [online]. January 1987, pp. 297. Available from: http://books.google.com/books?id=SiFmAAAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover.

0048

34.

PEEV, D.I. Portable Motor Oil Quality Control System Based on a Diferential Impedance Analysis. In: Acta technologica agriculturae (online), roč. 13, 2010, č. 3. 2010,

0000

35.

PICKETT, Charles. Cars and Culture - Our driving Passions. Sydney: Powerhouse Publishing and HarperCollins, 1998. ISBN 0 7322 617 3.

0003

36.

PLAŠČAK, I., JURIĆ, T. and EMERT, R. Application of Ferrography in Condition Based Maintenance. In: Strojarstvo. 2010, Vol. 52, no. 2, pp. 233–240.

0000

37.

PRATESH, J. and KB, M. Machine Fault Signature Analysis. In: International Journal of Rotating Machinery. 2008, Vol. 2008.

0010

38.

PRICE, C., HALLAM, D.L., HEATH, G.A., CREAGH, D.C. and ASHTON, J. An electrochemical study of waxes for bronze sculpture. In: Metal 95: proceedings of the International Conference on Metals Conservation. United Kingdom: Earthscan Ltd., 1997. pp. 233–241. ISBN 1-873936-67-2.

Waxes used in the preservation of metallic sculptures were assessed for corrosion protection using a variety of physical and chemical methods, including x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Artificially and naturally aged wax coatings were compared to unaged samples, and variation in performance was also related to method of application. As a consequence of these studies the wax BeSq 195 was chosen to be the most effective replacement for the currently used TWA 2095. Applied in the molten state, BeSq 195 appears to provide an effective coating for bronze. This compares with Mitsui 420, in which application by buffing is recommended. Author Abstract

1.

PROCTER, Eileen, MCGEEHAN, Helen and HALLAM, David. Analysis of World War One German Aircraft Surface Coating. In: AICCM Bulletin. 2002 2000, Vol. 25.

0000

2.

R.A, Roberts. Paint Removal Through Plastic Media Blasting - A Dream Come True. In: MOBILITY., The Engineering Resource for Advancing (ed.). S.l.: s.n.,

0000

Discusses paint removal by plastic media blasting instead of using acid paint strippers. Discusses the background of its use, proposal for its use at the Hill Air Force Base, Utah, advantages and disadvantages of use, limitations, economics and the future.

F: PBS Record: 50; O: (03) RAR Consultants (13) Seattle, Washington (26) 5 pges. (33) 860703 (42) Have photocopy. Distributed by the Society of Automotive Engineers.

3.

RICARDO, H.R. The Ricardo story. S.l.: SAE, 1992.

0315

4.

RICE, D. W., CAPPELL, R. J., KINSOLVING, W. and LASKOWSKI, J. J. Indoor Corrosion of Metals. In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society. April 1980, Vol. 127, no. 4, pp. 891–901.

0046

F: PBS Record: 150; O: (42) have

5.

RICHARDS, R.W., RICHARDS, V.L. and MAY, S.R. Western Australian marine engineering, its history and preservation: a case study of the West Ho marine engine restoration. In: Fifth National Conference on Engineering Heritage 1990, Perth 3-5 December 1990: interpreting engineering heritage. Australia: Institution of Engineers, Australia. Western Australia Division, 1990. pp. 89–94. ISBN 0-909421-23-4.

Marine engine design and development began in Western Australia by enterprising people adapting commercial models of motorbike engines, modifying outboard motors to inboard motors and developing improvements of existing marine engines. One of Western Australia’s first pioneers was Ingvald (Tommy) Overgaad whose inboard marine engines sold under the brand name West Ho. Opening his own engineering business in 1933, his work included replacing cylinders of Evinrude Elto outboards, adapting defunct Harley Davidson motorbike engines to inboard marine engines and then manufacturing single and later twin cylinder West Ho engines. The West Ho that was restored is a twin-cylinder, two-stroke gasoline engine which develops 8 hp at 1,500 rpm. This engine was made in 1958 in the latter part of Overgaad’s career. This engine was conserved and restored to working order because it is considered an important part of Western Australian maritime engineering heritage. Another primary reason for restoration was to reduce the corrosion processes usually associated with long-term storage of engines. Hence, the chemical conservation regimes were organized to preserve the original integrity of the engine and to develop professional standards for museums. Author Abstract Ian D. MacLeod

6.

ROCCA, Emmanuel and MIRAMBET, François. The electrochemical techniques for the diagnosis and restoration treatments of technical and industrial heritage: three examples of metallic artefacts. In: Journal of Solid State Electrochemistry [online]. 14 July 2009, Vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 415–423. [Accessed 25 March 2012]. DOI 10.1007/s10008-009-0889-z. Available from: http://www.springerlink.com/index/10.1007/s10008-009-0889-z.

7.

RON DICK. Flying Historical Aircraft: The view from the Cockpit. In: MARK G MAPES (ed.), Risks and Rewards: Perspectives on operating Mechanical Artifacts. Hagley Museum and Library: Hagley Museum and Library, 1991. pp. pp 34–41.

0000

undefined (02)  Air vice marshal RAF(ret) (03)  Confederate Air Force (08)  Hagley Fellow and Conference coordinator (13)  Hagley Museum and Library

8.

ROSUNALLY, Y., STOYANOV, S., BAILEY, C., MASON, P., CAMPBELL, S., MONGER, G. and BELL, I. Fusion approach for predictive maintenance of heritage structures. In: Prognostics and Health Management Conference, 2010. PHM’10. S.l.: s.n., 2010. pp. 1–6.

0000

The Cutty Sark is undergoing major conservation to slow down the deterioration of the original Victorian fabric of the ship. While the conservation work being carried out is “state of the art,” there is no evidence at present of the effectiveness of the conservation work over the next fifty years. A prognostics framework is being developed to monitor the “health” of the ship’s iron structures to help ensure a 50 year life once conservation is completed, with only minor deterioration taking place over time. This paper presents the prognostics framework being developed, which encompasses four approaches: 1-Canary and Parrot devices, 2-Physics-of-Failure (PoF) models, 3-Precursor Monitoring and Data Trend Analysis, and 4-Bayesian Networks. “Canary” and “Parrot” devices have been designed to mimic the actual mechanisms that would lead to failure of the iron structures, with canary devices failing faster to act as an indicator of forthcoming failures, while parrot devices fail at the same rate as the structure under consideration. A PoF model based on a decrease of the corrosion rate over time is used to predict the remaining life of an iron structure. Mahalanobis Distance (MD) is used as a precursor monitoring technique to obtain a single comparison metric from multiple sensor data to represent anomalies detected in the system. Bayesian Network models are then used as a fusion technique, integrating remaining life predictions from PoF models with information of possible anomalies from MD analysis to provide a new prediction of remaining life. This paper describes why, and how the four approaches are used for diagnostic and prognostics purposes, and how they are integrated into the prognostics framework.

9.

ROWLANDS, T LEEMAN and M. TEMPORARY ANTI CORROSIVES - THEIR SELECTION AND USE. In: CORROSION AUSTRLASIA. Vol. 16, no. 2.

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(42) CORROSION OF METAL ARTICLES BETWEEN MANUFACTURING AND FABRICATION PROCESS IS A FREQUENT PROBLEM, AND CAN BE ELIMINATED BY CONTROL OF PROCESSING AND STORAGE ENVIRONMENT AND/OR THE USE OF TEMPORARY ANTI CORROSIVE COATINGS.

10.

RUSSELL, Roslyn and WINKWORTH, Kylie. Significance 2.0: a guide to assessing the significance of collections - table of contents. In: [online]. 2010. [Accessed 18 July 2012]. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/heritage/publications/significance2-0/.

11.

SALIMBENI, R., PINI, R. and SIANO, S. Achievement of optimum laser cleaning in the restoration of artworks: expected improvements by on-line optical diagnostics. In: Spectrochimica Acta Part B: Atomic Spectroscopy. 2001, Vol. 56, no. 6, pp. 877–885.

0022

12.

SATO, Michio. Transportation Museum and conservation of railway heritage. In: International Symposium on the Conservation and Restoration of Cultural Property: conservation of industrial collections, November 4-November 6, 1998. Japan: Tokyo Kokuritsu Bunkazai Kenkyujo, 1998. pp. 139–153.

Provides a brief history of the Transportation Museum from 1911 to the present and discusses some of the earlier conservation projects undertaken there, e.g., Japanese National Railways no. 1 locomotive and no. 1 bus. The author notes the 1958 formulation of the “Regulations Concerning the Protection of Railway Monuments,” the 1963 introduction of the railway quasi-monument system which allowed regional level monument designation, the 1991 formation of the Railway Conservation Society of Japan, all of which aided in the preservation of the Japanese railway heritage. He also discusses the problems involved in preservation--no budgetary backup, no designations since 1972, no tax privileges granted to private museums and conservation activities, loss of knowledge of manufacturing techniques, unavailable parts. Rebecca Anne Rushfield

13.

SCHMITT, G. Global needs for knowledge dissemination, research, and development in materials deterioration and corrosion control. In: World Corrosion Organization, New York. 2009,

0004

14.

SCHMITT, G. F. US Airforce Organic Coating Practices for Aircraft Protection. In: Metal Finishing. 1981, Vol. 79, no. 11, pp. 41–46.

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Protective organic coatings for aircraft reviewed.

15.

SEIPELT, Brigitte, PILZ, Monika and KIESENBERG, Joerg. Transparent coatings: suitable corrosion protection for industrial heritage made of iron? In: Metal 98: proceedings of the International Conference on Metals Conservation = Actes de la conférence internationale sur la conservation des métaux: Draguignan-Figanières, France, 27-29 May 1998. United Kingdom: Earthscan Ltd., 1998. pp. 291–296. ISBN 1-873936-82-6.

Over the last 200 years industrial development has drastically changed the face of Europe. Today, there is an increasing need to maintain the most significant industrial complexes as witness of that historical period. In consequence, an appropriate form of conservation is required for this industrial heritage made of iron and steel. However, preserving traces of daily use and handling in order to keep the original appearance excludes in most cases technical maintenance with pigmented coatings layers. A joint research project was set up in Germany to study the performance of transparent coating systems applied on partly corroded substrates. In this report the first results of the laboratory work are presented. In addition to conventional products made of pure organic materials like oils, waxes, and lacquers, new inorganic-organic hybrid materials (ORMOCER) are being tested for their suitability as an effective protection against further corrosion. Results will be used in pilot applications on selected objects. Author Abstract

16.

SIATOU, A., ARGYROPOULOS, V., CHARALAMBOUS, D., POLIKRETI, K. and KAMINARI, A. Testing new coating systems for the protection of metal collections exposed in uncontrolled museum environment. In: Strategies for saving our cultural heritage. Proceedings of the international conference on conservation strategies for saving indoor metallic collections, Cairo. S.l.: s.n., 2007. pp. 115–120.

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17.

SLOGGETT, Robyn. Expanding the conservation canon: assessing cross-cultural and interdisciplinary collaborations in conservation. In: Studies in conservation. 2009, Vol. 54, no. 3, pp. 170–183.

Explores some of the dilemmas that relate to the existence of collections of cultural material and efforts to preserve them. The article examines issues that arise when multiple points of view are focused on the origins, ownership, custodianship, and meaning of such material. Such an investigation is impossible without exploring the landscape in which cultural materials conservation has developed. In doing this, it is necessary to identify the boundaries of the disciplinary territory that currently frame conservation practice and to investigate the role of conservation at the edges of this terrain; the boundary knowledge of the discipline where interdisciplinary knowledge is developed and traded. This article argues that conservation has an important contribution to make along the axis of broader social and humanitarian concerns and that new disciplinary and cultural intersections are a critical part of contemporary conservation practice. It also discusses some strategies that may usefully strengthen the role of conservation beyond institutions and support collaborations for cultural replenishment and continuity. Author Abstract

18.

SMITH, R.D. Drawing the line-Reversibility and compromise in the conservation of arms and armour. In: Reversibility-Does it exist. 1999,

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19.

STAELENS, Y. and MORRIS, D. Crossing the Line-sustainability and large object conservation in musuems and heritage collections. In: 2010,

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20.

STAMBOLOV, T. The Corrosion and Conservation of Metallic Antiquities and Works of Art. Amsterdam: Central Research Laboratory for Objects of Art and Science., [no date].

0031

Discusses the general principles of corrosion and preservation, and the metallurgy, corrosion and conservation of copper and copper alloys, iron, lead, tin, silver, gold, and metallic antiquities.

21.

SUN, Jun, WOOD, R.J.K., WANG, L., CARE, I. and POWRIE, H.E.G. Wear monitoring of bearing steel using electrostatic and acoustic emission techniques. In: Wear [online]. July 2005, Vol. 259, no. 7–12, pp. 1482–1489. DOI 10.1016/j.wear.2005.02.021. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0043164805001316.

0017

Both acoustic emission (AE) and electrostatic (ES) wear monitoring are emerging as useful real-time condition monitoring techniques. These techniques are believed to be sensitive to different aspects of the physics of contact and surface degradation prior to the onset of severe wear. Thus, if both systems are used to monitor tribo-contacts, the physics of early contact degradation could be elucidated and the potential of the systems to detect precursors to severe wear could be investigated. This paper uses AE and ES charge signals generated by a bearing steel contact under dry sliding conditions to monitor the various phases of delamination wear. Tests were undertaken using an instrumented pin-on-disc (PoD) tribometer, which enabled continuous measurement of friction, surface temperature, linear wear, AE and ES signals. The AE and ES results were found to correlate with friction levels and wear rates. From the friction level, three distinct regions were identified and the wear mechanisms within each region were found (by SEM and EDS analysis) to be running-in, delamination/oxidation and oxidation.

22.

THURROWGOOD, David and HALLAM, D. L. Preserving significance: Why the journey mattered more than the car. In: Big Stuff: Care of Large Technology Objects [online]. Australian War Memorial, Canberra, Australia: Australian War Memorial, 29 November 2004. Available from: www.awm.gov.au/events/conference/bigstuff/index.asp.

The conservation of technological objects in social history museums requires a modified approach to conventional static conservation or traditional restoration projects. Objects in these museums are being preserved more for the story they embody than for the technology they represent. Leading up to the opening of the National Museum of Australia (NMA), conservation was undertaken on one of its most valued objects, the Francis Birtles Bean car. The car became internationally famous in the 1920s for the journeys it undertook, including one from London to Melbourne. The NMA takes into account an object’s function as much as its form when undertaking conservation projects. Finding a balance between an object’s preservation and the uses a museum seeks to put it to can be especially challenging when treating functional technology. This paper will discuss some of the ethical and practical approaches to conserving technology at the NMA using as a principal example the Bean conservation project. This paper is designed to be read in conjunction with the other material being presented by the NMA at this conference. It will primarily cover ethical issues of preserving story, while our other work will cover practical applications.

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THURROWGOOD, David, OTIENO-ALEGO, Vincent, PEARSON, Colin and BAILEY, George. Developing a conservation treatment using linear dicarboxylates as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel in wash solutions following citric acid stripping. In: Metal 2001: proceedings of the international conference on metals conservation = Actes de la conférence internationale sur la conservation des métaux = Actas del congreso internacional sobre la conservacion de metales: Santiago, Chile 2-6 April 2001. Australia: Western Australian Museum, 2004. pp. 310–315. ISBN 1-920843-17-5.

Citric acid stripping is routinely used in the conservation of ferrous objects. The acid is washed from objects after stripping to prevent recorrosion during display and storage. Corrosion inhibitors such as chromates and nitrites are presently used in the wash solution to prevent or reduce recorrosion during this washing stage. Unfortunately, these chemical species pose considerable health and environmental problems, and their use is rapidly becoming restricted. Linear dicarboxylates have been proposed as environmentally benign and low toxic inhibitors for mild steel, copper, aluminum, and magnesium alloys. In this report, potentiodynamic and weight loss techniques have been used to explore the use of three a, ?-dicarboxylates (disodium salts of 1,8-octanedicarboxylic acid, 1,10-decanedicarboxylic acid, and 1,12-dodecanedicarboxylic acid) as alternative inhibitors to chromate and nitrite in rinse solutions for citric acid-stripped low-carbon steel. The results showed that dicarboxylates were effective inhibitors provided that a prerinse step was adopted in the procedure. Under these conditions, disodium salt of 1,8-octanedicarboxylic acid was found to have comparable inhibition efficiency to chromate. Nitrite solutions were observed to accelerate corrosion. This prerinse step also improved the performance of chromate solutions and was crucial to the overall performance of the dicarboxylate compounds. Author Abstract

24.

TOMS, L.A. Expert Systems, A Decade of Use for Used-Oil Data Interpretation. S.l. DTIC Document, 1996.

0002

25.

TOMS, L.A. Machinery Oil Analysis: Methods, Automation & Benefits: a Guide for Maintenance Managers, Supervisors & Technicians. S.l.: Coastal Skills Training, 1998.

0054

26.

TRAYSER, D.A., HEIN, G.M. and ELLIS, W.C. DETERIORATION OF FUELS AND FUEL-USING EQUIPMENT. S.l. DTIC Document, 1967.

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27.

TSE, Jonathan C.Y., LIU, Sam W.S., YEUNG, Evita S. and CHAN, Shing-wai. An integrated structural health monitoring system for the preservation of the historic fireboat Alexander Grantham. In: Metal 2010: proceedings of the interim meeting of the ICOM-CC Metal Working Group, October 11-15, 2010, Charleston, South Carolina, USA. United States: Clemson University, 2011. pp. 386–392. ISBN 978-0-9830399-2-1 (color); 978-0-9830399-1-4 (b&w).

The structural integrity of a metal artifact is always of concern to conservators and curators, particularly if the object is very large and intended for permanent display outdoors. Being the first vessel preserved as a historic relic in Hong Kong, the fireboat Alexander Grantham was lifted from the sea and has been on public display since 2006. Given the unfavorable, yet uncontrollable outdoor environment, the fireboat will inevitably suffer from degradation and perhaps structural failure, which may not be easily detected or identified at an early stage through visual inspection. For the sake of her long-term preservation, the Central Conservation Section in Hong Kong has pioneered the development of an integrated structural health monitoring system to monitor the structural stability of the vessel on exhibition. This contribution discusses the conservators’ experience in devising the system and the preliminary findings obtained from the program to illustrate the merits and limitations of its application on historic vessels. Author Abstract

28.

VASSTRÖM, Annette. Preservation of industrial heritage: what purpose? In: Industrial heritage, Austria 1987: TICCIH 1987, the Sixth International Conference on the Conservation of the Industrial Heritage, Austria 6th-12th September 1987. Transactions 2, Conference papers and results. Belgium: The International Committee for the Conservation of the Industrial Heritage, 1990. pp. 180–188.

Discusses the philosophy applied to both preservation and presentation, in particular reference to the Worker’s Museum in Copenhagen, Denmark. The author adopts a cultural-historical point of view. Various exhibits at the Copenhagen Worker’s Museum and the newly restored assembly hall are presented. ICCROM

29.

WARE, Micheal. The Motor Vehicle- The Ethics of Conservation and Restoration. In: National Motor Museum Bealieu. pp. 14pp.

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30.

WATKINSON, David, TANNER, Matthew, TURNER, Robert and LEWIS, Mark. SS Great Britain: teamwork as a platform for innovative conservation. In: The conservator. June 2005, Vol. 29, pp. 73–86.

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Brunel’s 1843 SS Great Britain was a technological milestone of world importance. It now rests in its original dry dock in Bristol, England. Research has established the significance of the ship, identified its inherent instability, and reviewed conservation options to support a successful 8.5 million pound Heritage Lottery Fund bid. The complex preservation project involved innovative use of desiccation to preserve the hull, along with a large-scale conservation program for the fabric of the ship and dockyard structures. The input of architects, engineers, conservators, corrosion scientists, historians, and many other specialists was managed directly by the executive director and a qualified project manager who maintained timetables and coordination. Research into the effect of relative humidity on the corrosion of chloride-infested iron provided data for use in a design that changed the dry dock into a climatically controlled envelope around the unstable hull. Author Abstract

31.

WILSON, B. Wear debris analysis group (1982-84). In: Industrial Lubrication and Tribology. 1994, Vol. 46, no. 2, pp. 3–4.

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32.

WILSON, L. and DEVEREUX, R. S.G. The Effect of Some Water-Displacing Corrosion Preventives on Corrosion of Aluminium Alloys 7075-T651 and 2024-T6. In: Metals Forum. Summer 1984, Vol. 7, no. 1, pp. Pgs.50–54.

0000

The effectiveness of six commercial water-displacing corrosion preventive formulations (WDCP’s) in inhibiting corrosion of two aluminium alloys used in aircraft construction has been investigated. All six WDCP’s tested were found to inhibit corrosion of the aluminium alloys significantly under the test conditions.

(42) Have. Registered by Australia Post - publication no.VBPO244

33.

The Protection of motor vehicles from corrosion. London: Society of Chemical Industry, 1958.

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34.

Restoration and conservation: report of the Fifth Congress of the Association of Technical Museum Personnel in Berlin, 1964. Germany: Verlag Bruno Hessling, 1964.

In Berlin in 1888 the world’s first museum laboratory was established, and yet after World War II, almost nothing remained of the State Museum or of its laboratory, and the cultural capital of Germany moved to Munich. In Munich, the Doerner Institute with its laboratory and workshops was established, and the Bavarian National Bureau for Care of Monuments developed. Elsewhere in Germany, there was a vacuum, with the exception of a few conservation workshops where technicians worked in isolation, out of touch with the latest advances in science and technology. It is to the credit of the Association of Technical Museum Personnel to have understood that isolation leads to suffocation and to have established a professional collaboration, throwing wide the doors of communication even beyond national boundaries. Created in 1956, the ATMP is an association of a large number of restorers actively concerned with their professional problems (holding congresses every two years) and with publication of their results. Their periodical, Der Präparator, is in its 11th year. (At the start, this periodical was not directly linked to the ATMP.) They also issue the Bibliographie des archäologischen Konservierungstechnik. The present publication, Restaurierung ind Konservierung, is the outcome of discussions of the fifth congress of the ATMP, held in Berlin in October 1964. Although the ATMP concerned itself at first primarily with the technical problems specific to archaeological and natural history museums, it later found a partner active in the fields of painting, sculpture, and the graphic arts in the Society of German Picture Restorers. Besides Germany, France, Great Britain, the Netherlands, and Switzerland have participated in the Berlin Congress. Of 23 contributions presented there, 19 are published in Restoration and Conservation. However, the conferees have, in fact, attacked a broader range of topics than is indicated by the title. The table of contents shows that attention is directed to a broad range of materials (historic monuments, stone monuments, mural paintings, textiles, zoologic preparations, etc.), of techniques (e.g., casting with Araldite and with rubber latex, preparation of dioramas, cleaning with an abrasive powder and compressed air, ultrasonic cleaning, photogrammetry of archaeological excavations), as well as of more theoretical topics, such as when gluing is justified, the potential offered by new plastic materials, or the chemical and physical properties of textiles. Recent developments abroad, such as the new laboratory of the British Museum in London, are given more than cursory notice, and even complex problems, such as work accidents or the collaboration of the restorer with his colleagues in other disciplines, are the subjects of articles. All are well done and have either practical or theoretical interest; some are illustrated and provided with a basic bibliography. Among these is the contribution of Artur Kratz, which explores new possibilities for the extraction of salts from friable stones. The technique is simple: the surface is protected with an impermeable film in which holes are pierced at the two extremities (this is not always possible!), and water is forced through under vacuum. The same technique can serve for the consolidation of stone by use of an appropriate substance. This is an excellent publication that does credit to the ATMP. Little by little, especially in Europe, specialists of good will are joining together; their methodology is being refined, and publications and monographs are multiplying. It is fortunate that Germany is participating in the general effort, despite the barrier of the “Länder” and of a number of excessively circumscribed university researchers in the museums. Paul Coremans

35.

“Smart sensing” of Oil Degradation and Oil Level Measurements in Gasoline Engines. In: 2000, Vol. 109.

36.

BigStuff: Care of Large Technology Objects. In: [online]. [Accessed 7 April 2010]. Available from: http://www.awm.gov.au/events/conference/bigstuff/index.asp.

37.

Temporary Corrosion Preventive. In: Australian Defence Specification.

0003

Published under Authority of Dept. of Defence

(42) This specification covers the requirements for six general types of temporary corrosion preventive, intended for the protection of both ferrous and non-ferrous metals.

38.

Corrosion Mapping of Historic Military Vehicles using the TD Focus-Scan. In: [online]. [Accessed 19 March 2012]. Available from: http://www.ndt.net/search/docs.php3?id=9992&content=1.

39.

MIL-STD-3003 A - VEHICLES WHEELED PREPARATION SHIPMENT STORAGE. In: [online]. [Accessed 22 March 2012]. Available from: http://www.everyspec.com/MIL-STD/MIL-STD+(3000+-+9999)/MIL-STD-3003A_22926/.

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VEHICLES, WHEELED: PREPARATION FOR SHIPMENT AND STORAGE OF. S.l.: s.n.

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41.

Combined Use of Vapor Corrosion Inhibitors (VCI) and Dehumidification (DH) for Plant and Equipment Mothballing or Lay-Up. In: [online]. [Accessed 19 June 2012]. Available from: http://www.onepetro.org/mslib/servlet/onepetropreview?id=NACE-98244.